Friday, April 29, 2011

Japan Earthquake Update; 4/29/11

Japan Earthquake Update;
The National Police Agency of Japan said on Friday that the March 11 earthquake and tsunami have left 14,616 people dead and 11,111 others unaccounted for in Japan by Thursday. In Miyagi Prefecture, 8,793 people were killed, while the figure for Iwate Prefecture was 4,283. About 126,000 survivors are still staying in shelters across the country. A 9.0-magnitude earthquake hit the Pacific coastal areas of northeastern and eastern Japan on March 11, triggering an enormous tsunami. Heavy casualties and extensive damage have been caused by the twin disasters.

A new book about Space Weather

I got a new book yesterday.

Space Weather: Physics and Effects Click Here (Amazon)
by; Volker Bothmer (Author) and Ioannis A. Daglis (Author)
Published in November of 2006

From the reviews:

"The volume surveys the broad expanse of space weather through 14 chapters contributed by 20 expert practitioners. … its extensive reference lists at the end of each chapter are extremely valuable. I believe the book functions best by sitting on the library reference shelf where it can be readily consulted as needed." (Thomas J. Bogdan, Physics Today, December 2007)

"Space Weather: Physics and Effects is an attempt to summarize the entire field of space weather. … It is generally well produced, includes an exhaustive table of contents and has nearly 40 pages of prefatory materials including a four-page list of acronyms, and what seems like an adequate index." (W. Jeffrey Hughes, EOS, March, 2009)

Book Description

The editors present a state-of-the-art overview on the Physics of Space Weather and its effects on technological and biological systems on the ground and in space. It opens with a general introduction on the subject, followed by a historical review on the major developments in the field of solar terrestrial relationships leading to its development into the up-to-date field of space weather. Specific emphasis is placed on the technological effects that have impacted society in the past century at times of major solar activity. Chapter 2 summarizes key milestones, starting from the base of solar observations with classic telescopes up to recent space observations and new mission developments with EUV and X-ray telescopes (e.g., STEREO), yielding an unprecedented view of the sun-earth system. Chapter 3 provides a scientific summary of the present understanding of the physics of the sun-earth system based on the latest results from spacecraft designed to observe the Sun, the interplanetary medium and geospace. Chapter 4 describes how the plasma and magnetic field structure of the earth's magnetosphere is impacted by the variation of the solar and interplanetary conditions, providing the necessary science and technology background for missions in low and near earth's orbit. Chapter 5 elaborates the physics of the layer of the earth's upper atmosphere that is the cause of disruptions in radio-wave communications and GPS (Global Positioning System) errors, which is of crucial importance for projects like Galileo. In Chapters 6-10, the impacts of technology used up to now in space, on earth and on life are reviewed.

My Stamp Collecting Blog

Counter Added January 1, 2011

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The A index [ LOW is GOOD ]

  • 1 to 6 is BEST
  • 7 to 9 is OK
  • 11 or more is BAD

Represents the overall geomagnetic condition of the ionosphere ("Ap" if averaged from the Kp-Index) (an average of the eight 3-hour K-Indices) ('A' referring to amplitude) over a given 24 hour period, ranging (linearly) typically from 1-100 but theoretically up to 400.

A lower A-Index generally suggests better propagation on the 10, 12, 15, 17, & 20 Meter Bands; a low & steady Ap-Index generally suggest good propagation on the 30, 40, 60, 80, & 160 Meter Bands.

SFI index [ HIGH is GOOD ]

  • 70 NOT GOOD
  • 80 GOOD
  • 90 BETTER
  • 100+ BEST

The measure of total radio emissions from the sun at 10.7cm (2800 MHz), on a scale of 60 (no sunspots) to 300, generally corresponding to the sunspot level, but being too low in energy to cause ionization, not related to the ionization level of the Ionosphere.

Higher Solar Flux generally suggests better propagation on the 10, 12, 15, 17, & 20 Meter Bands; Solar Flux rarely affects the 30, 40, 60, 80, & 160 Meter Bands.

K index [ LOW is GOOD ]

  • 0 or 1 is BEST
  • 2 is OK
  • 3 or more is BAD
  • 5 is VERY VERY BAD

The overall geomagnetic condition of the ionosphere ("Kp" if averaged over the planet) over the past 3 hours, measured by 13 magnetometers between 46 & 63 degrees of latitude, and ranging quasi-logarithmically from 0-9. Designed to detect solar particle radiation by its magnetic effect. A higher K-index generally means worse HF conditions.

A lower K-Index generally suggests better propagation on the 10, 12, 15, 17, & 20 Meter Bands; a low & steady Kp-Index generally suggest good propagation on the 30, 40, 60, 80, & 160 Meter Bands.

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